Vaccination timeline

Welcome to the e-Bug vaccination timeline – Scroll down to view the UK routine vaccination schedule; updated for Autumn 2019.

Find all the information you need about the vaccines we receive from childhood to old age, and the diseases they protect us from in a new interactive format.

Click the button below to download a checklist of UK routine vaccinations and keep track of your vaccination history!

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2 Months

1st diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Hib and hepatitis B 6-in-1

This vaccine is one of the first vaccines given to babies as part of the childhood vaccination programme. The 6-in-1 vaccine, also known as DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB Vaccine, is given as a single injection and protects against six childhood diseases. These six diseases are diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (Pertussis), polio, Hib (Haemophilus influenzaetype b) and hepatitis B. Three doses of this vaccine are given at monthly intervals; the first at two months, the second at three months and the final dose at four months old. The 6-in-1 vaccine is considered to be very safe and to provide good protection against these six diseases.

1st Pneumococcal infection

The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is given to protect against infections caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also called pneumococcus. The vaccine can protect against 13 strains of pneumococcus. The vaccine is given to babies in three doses, each as single injection. These are given at two months, four months and 12 - 13 months. The infection can be easily spread through close contact through air droplets which are released during a sneeze or a cough. Severe pneumococcal infections can cause brain damage or even death.

1st Rotavirus

The rotavirus vaccine is an oral vaccine that is given to babies in two doses, the first at two months old and the second at three months old, to protect against rotavirus infections. The vaccine is given in a liquid form straight into a baby’s mouth. Rotavirus is highly infectious and can cause symptoms such as diarrhoea, vomiting and fever. Most children will recover at home, although severe symptoms may lead to dehydration which could require hospitalisation. The vaccine has been shown to work well and it is very safe.

1st Meningitis B

The Meningitis B vaccine protects against bacterial infections caused by meningococcal group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children. These bacteria can be very serious and cause meningitis and septicaemia. The Men B vaccine used is called Bexsero, and is given as a single injection to the thigh. Children are given the first of three doses at two months old. The second dose is then given at four months, and a final dose at one year old. The vaccine has received no safety concerns.

3 Months

2nd diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Hib and hepatitis B 6-in-1

This vaccine is one of the first vaccines given to babies as part of the childhood vaccination programme. The 6-in-1 vaccine, also known as DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB Vaccine, is given as a single injection and protects against six childhood diseases. These six diseases are diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (Pertussis), polio, Hib (Haemophilus influenzaetype b) and hepatitis B. Three doses of this vaccine are given at monthly intervals; the first at two months, the second at three months and the final dose at four months old. The 6-in-1 vaccine is considered to be very safe and to provide good protection against these six diseases.

2nd Rotavirus

The rotavirus vaccine is an oral vaccine that is given to babies in two doses, the first at two months old and the second at three months old, to protect against rotavirus infections. The vaccine is given in a liquid form straight into a baby’s mouth. Rotavirus is highly infectious and can cause symptoms such as diarrhoea, vomiting and fever. Most children will recover at home, although severe symptoms may lead to dehydration which could require hospitalisation. The vaccine has been shown to work well and it is very safe.

4 Months

3rd diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Hib and hepatitis B 6-in-1

This vaccine is one of the first vaccines given to babies as part of the childhood vaccination programme. The 6-in-1 vaccine, also known as DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB Vaccine, is given as a single injection and protects against six childhood diseases. These six diseases are diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (Pertussis), polio, Hib (Haemophilus influenzaetype b) and hepatitis B. Three doses of this vaccine are given at monthly intervals; the first at two months, the second at three months and the final dose at four months old. The 6-in-1 vaccine is considered to be very safe and to provide good protection against these six diseases.

2nd Pneumococcal infection

The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is given to protect against infections caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also called pneumococcus. The vaccine can protect against 13 strains of pneumococcus. The vaccine is given to babies in three doses, each as single injection. These are given at two months, four months and 12 - 13 months. The infection can be easily spread through close contact through air droplets which are released during a sneeze or a cough. Severe pneumococcal infections can cause brain damage or even death.

2nd Meningitis B

The Meningitis B vaccine protects against bacterial infections caused by meningococcal group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children. These bacteria can be very serious and cause meningitis and septicaemia. The Men B vaccine used is called Bexsero, and is given as a single injection to the thigh. Children are given the first of three doses at two months old. The second dose is then given at four months, and a final dose at one year old. The vaccine has received no safety concerns.

12 - 13 Months

Booster Hib, Meningitis C

The Hib/Men C vaccine is given to children aged 12 - 13 months as a single injection containing the meningitis C and Hib (fourth dose). The vaccine boosts the immunity to Hib provided by the 5-in-1 vaccine that was given at two, three, and four months and the Men C vaccine that was given at 3 months. This booster will provide protection for the child against Meningitis C and Hib into adulthood. The booster vaccine is very safe and is inactive, meaning that it doesn’t contain any live organisms. As a result of the NHS childhood vaccination programme, rates of Hib and Men C are at their lowest ever in the UK.

1st measles, mumps, rubella

The MMR vaccine is a combined vaccine that protects against three illnesses: measles, mumps and rubella. The vaccine is given in two doses, the first between 12 and 13 months and the second at just over 3 years. Measles, mumps and rubella are highly contagious, can cause serious illness, and are potentially life threatening. Since the introduction of the MMR vaccine the number of cases of these illnesses in the UK has dropped overall, although more recently there has been an increase in the number of cases of measles. It is therefore important to make sure you are up to date with the MMR vaccine.

Booster Pneumococcal Infection

The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is given to protect against infections caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also called pneumococcus. The vaccine can protect against 13 strains of pneumococcus. The vaccine is given to babies in three doses, each as single injection. These are given at two months, four months and 12 - 13 months. The infection can be easily spread through close contact through air droplets which are released during a sneeze or a cough. Severe pneumococcal infections can cause brain damage or even death.

3rd Meningitis B

The Meningitis B vaccine protects against bacterial infections caused by meningococcal group B bacteria, which are responsible for more than 90% of meningococcal infections in young children. These bacteria can be very serious and cause meningitis and septicaemia. The Men B vaccine used is called Bexsero, and is given as a single injection to the thigh. Children are given the first of three doses at two months old. The second dose is then given at four months, and a final dose at one year old. The vaccine has received no safety concerns.

3 - 4 Years

Booster: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio

The 4-in-1 booster vaccine is given to pre-school aged children at about 3 years and 4 months old. This booster protects against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and polio. The booster will provide protection against these four illnesses until the children receive their teenage boosters between 13-18 years old.

2nd measles, mumps and rubella

The MMR vaccine is a combined vaccine that protects against three illnesses: measles, mumps and rubella. The vaccine is given in two doses, the first between 12 and 13 months and the second at just over 3 years. Measles, mumps and rubella are highly contagious, can cause serious illness, and are potentially life threatening. Since the introduction of the MMR vaccine the number of cases of these illnesses in the UK has dropped overall, although more recently there has been an increase in the number of cases of measles. It is therefore important to make sure you are up to date with the MMR vaccine.

12 - 13 Years

1st and 2nd Human papillomavirus

The HPV vaccine protects against the Human Papilloma Virus which is associated with 99% of cervical cancer cases as well as 90% of anal cancers, about 70% of vaginal and vulvar cancers and more than 60% of penile cancers. It is now offered to all 12 - 13 year olds and is given over a one year period in 2 doses. There are many types of HPV virus; some low-risk types are associated with warts or verrucae, but high-risk types can be associated with cervical, mouth, throat and anal cancers. HPV is very common and can spread easily through sexual activity. The vaccine provides protection against two types of HPV that are responsible for 70% of cervical cancer cases. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women under the age of 35 and it is estimated that the HPV vaccine programme could prevent over 64,000 cervical cancers and nearly 50,000 non-cervical cancers by 2058.

14 Years

Booster: diphtheria, tetanus, polio

This vaccine is known as the 3-in-1 teenage booster, or the Td/IPV, and provides continued protection against diphtheria, tetanus and polio. This booster vaccine is usually given between the ages of 13 and 18 and is given as a single injection.

Meningitis ACWY

The Men ACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against four different causes of meningitis and septicaemia – meningococcal (Men) A, C, W and Y diseases. These bacteria can cause meningitis and septicaemia. There are two Men ACWY vaccines called Nimenrix and Menveo. They are very similar and both work equally well. Children aged 14 (school year 9) will be offered the Men ACWY vaccine in school as part of the routine adolescent schools programme alongside the 3-in-1 teenage booster, and as a direct replacement for the Men C vaccination. There is also a catch-up vaccination programme for first-time university students up to the age of 25.

19 - 25 Years

First-time students only: Meningitis ACWY

The Men ACWY vaccine is given by a single injection into the upper arm and protects against four different causes of meningitis and septicaemia – meningococcal (Men) A, C, W and Y diseases. These bacteria can cause meningitis and septicaemia. There are two Men ACWY vaccines called Nimenrix and Menveo. They are very similar and both work equally well. Children aged 14 (school year 9) will be offered the Men ACWY vaccine in school as part of the routine adolescent schools programme alongside the 3-in-1 teenage booster, and as a direct replacement for the Men C vaccination. There is also a catch-up vaccination programme for first-time university students up to the age of 25.

65 Years

Flu Vaccine

Flu can be unpleasant but if you are already unwell or have underlying health issues, flu can be more severe. Research has shown the flu vaccine to successfully protect against the flu; however, it may not provide immunity against all flu viruses and the level of protection it provides may vary between each person. The vaccine can make the symptoms milder and the flu virus shorter lived. New flu vaccines are developed each year, as the protection provided by the vaccine decreases and new flu virus strains arise each year

Pneumococcal Vaccine

The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine or PPV protects against pneumococcal infections which are caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae. The vaccine is given to over 65s as they may be more at risk of developing complications associated with a pneumococcal infection. The vaccine is given as a single injection which should provide the required immunity for lifelong protection against pneumococcal infections. Those with long term underlying health problems may need to be given a pneumococcal vaccine every five year. There are over 90 strains of pneumococcal bacteria identified, the PPV vaccine protects against 23 different strains.

70 Years

Shingles Vaccine

The shingles vaccine is given to those aged 70 or 79 to protect against shingles. This vaccine is given as a single injection to reduce the risk of developing shingles. Shingles, also known as herpes zoster, is a painful skin infection that can cause rashes and blisters. Shingles is caused by the reawakening of the chicken pox virus due to illness, ageing and other factors. The shingles vaccine contains a weakened chicken pox virus.

Special Vaccinations

Certain vaccines that are not given as part of the NHS childhood routine vaccination programme can be given to those in risk groups. This may include chickenpox vaccine for healthcare workers and BCG for infants with immediate family from countries with high rates of tuberculosis (TB) Pregnant women need the pertussis and flu vaccinations to help protect them and/or their baby. Visit https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/ or ask your GP practice for more information.

Travel Vaccinations

When travelling outside of the UK to other parts of the world, you may need to be vaccinated against infectious diseases such as yellow fever, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and typhoid. It is important to check which vaccinations you require before travelling. You can visit NaTHNaC (National Travel Health Network and Centre) to check before you travel at: https://travelhealthpro.org.uk/

 

 

 

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